Dolphins in the Navy

Since I live in Hawaii, news about dolphins always catches my eye. I’ve seen them many times here in the wild. Once I was alone meditating on the cliffs on the ocean at Honaunau, a sacred spot, when an entire pod swam up to the cliff shore directly underneath me. They looked up at me as if to say, hello, did you call? It was both exhilarating and eerie.

Last week I noticed the Navy released information about their program using dolphins and sea lions to patrol military bases. Trained Navy dolphins can drop a beacon if they detect a person in the water; they can also detect underwater mines. Dolphins were used for this in Iraq in 2003. They also patrolled the bay in San Diego during the Republican National Convention in 1996.

The U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program explains dolphins are useful for their echolocation, or biological sonar, which enables them to locate mines or other objects underwater. The Navy also lists a page of FAQs about their program, to explain questions such as why they use marine mammals (they also employ sea lions and whales), and whether they use them for offensive warfare. They claim they do not train them to attack, yet after Hurricane Katrina there were reports that three dozen U.S. military dolphins, which had been trained and fitted with toxic darts, had been washed away and were missing. They were supposedly accounted for soon after, and the Pentagon denied they were ever trained to attack. Perhaps the fear mongers and rumor mill at work; perhaps the truth is still secret.

The history of the use of marine mammals by the military can be found at PBS. Begun in 1960, the program was originally classified. Rumors still abound that dolphins were used to attack and kill enemy swimmers in Vietnam. By the 1990s, with the Cold War over, much (but not all) of the program was declassified and many of the dolphins were retired. Some still claim dolphins were used to attack and kill; many animal rights organizations object to their employment, and I found a petition online objecting to the Navy’s use of dolphins.

Many people believe dolphins are particularly special, beyond their incredible intelligence. I’ve seen many spiritual books and websites devoted to them. John Lilly was a scientist who was responsible for much of the early research involving dolphins and their means of communication, providing the basis for the movie “Day of the Dolphin” and the enactment of the Marine Mammal Protection Act. He also contributed to research involving psychology and human consciousness, including use of the isolation tank (forming the basis for the movie “Altered States”), and is often discussed alongside people like Aldous Huxley. His work was cited in an article by Steve Hammons, who also responded to the recent news about dolphins in the Navy. Hammons noted that the recently declassified information about Project Stargate includes a 1987 report called “A Remote Action Investigation with Marine Animals” regarding research conducted by SRI International into anomalous cognition. In other words, the Pentagon is looking into remote viewing, telepathy and other ESP phenomena relating to dolphins and our means to communicate with them.

The Perfect Wave

Some of you might already know a little about me and how my life changed so drastically nearly eight years ago. Since then I’ve seen the world, and the Universe, with new eyes and an awakened soul, now charged with pointing out the strange and impractical as I’d never seen them before.

My book, Surfing the Tao: A Revolution of Free Will was published nearly three years ago now; sometimes I’m asked if I will write another, but so far every time I’ve tried to start, that same strange book keeps coming out of me again – nearly word for word, no matter how long I’ve put it aside and refused to look at it.

That is despite the news and recent events I could probably add, and of course three more years of continued research which I am still compulsively driven towards. In the end, the point remains the same and the mission goes on as before. In that sense nothing has changed.

It is a slow but powerful mission; some days seem stagnant, others surge with answers and further possibilities. I sometimes wonder; should I be doing more? But the answer is always the same: it has a life of its own now, and must be allowed to grow at its own rate.

Something like learning to surf, then waiting for the perfect wave. It’ll come eventually.

UFO sighting makes news in Chicago

This past November airline personnel at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago reported sighting an unknown craft hovering in the area. The Chicago Tribune finally mentioned it on January 1, and then commented on it again the other day, after a flood of responses. I especially liked this one:

“Hmm. Looks like we’re being visited by advanced craft from other worlds, and not only is the U.S. government keen to cover up the details, so are many private corporations whose existence would be threatened by the free-energy technology that powers these vehicles.”

–Andrew Johnson, United Kingdom

I always find it interesting when these things hit the mainstream news.

Ancient Ice Shelf Breaks Free from Canadian Arctic

As an update to my last entry, today CNN reports that the 41-square mile Ayles Ice Shelf, one of the six major ice shelves which remain in Canada’s arctic, broke off the coast about 16 months ago.

According to scientists, this “disturning event” shows “we are crossing climate thresholds.”

Island Disappears Beneath the Waves

This week, an article in The Independent entitled “Disappearing world: Global warming claims tropical island” seems to confirm for the first time that an inhabited island has been officially washed off the face of the Earth by rising seas. “The obliteration of Lohachara island, in India’s part of the Sundarbans where the Ganges and the Brahmaputra rivers empty into the Bay of Bengal, marks the moment when one of the most apocalyptic predictions of environmentalists and climate scientists has started coming true.” Refugees fled to neighbor islands which are doomed to similar fates; a total of 70,000 people will soon become homeless due to global warming.

The Independent also reported eight years ago when the first uninhabited islands, in the Pacific nation of Kiribati, “vanished beneath the waves.” One may remember when the tiny island nation of Tuvalu was evacuated in 2001. Another article from 2002, “Global Warming & Rising Oceans” by Florida State University oceanographer Jeffrey Chanton, Ph.D., explains that rising oceans are eroding coastal areas and submerging low-lying islands. He suggests the “near future could see millions of ‘climate refugees’”, and recommends alternative fuel sources to alleviate the problem. His references include great links to scientific studies, online maps of sea levels, and a personal carbon counter to estimate your own CO2 emissions.

By now most people have seen or at least heard about Al Gore’s movie An Inconvenient Truth, about global warming. What have we done to our planet, and can it be saved?

“The world is sacred. It can’t be improved. If you tamper with it, you’ll ruin it. If you treat it like an object, you’ll lose it.” –Tao Te Ching #29

Thanks to www.wanttoknow.info

Merry Christmas!

Aloha and Mele Kalikimaka, warm Hawaiian wishes this Christmas! Peace on Earth and Goodwill to all.

Keith Olbermann

Very brave commentary on the loss of civil liberties in our new age. If you haven’t seen it yet check it out.